Lovely Little Palmiers

palmiers

Colder days, warm beverages. A cup of steaming coffee, a pot of tea, some mulled cider warms my cold cold heart hands. Hmmm. When I have the time, I try to make it a ritual by drinking from pretty vintage porcelain cups and providing a bite-sized sweet treat too.

One such delicacy I particularly adore is Palmiers. These elegant French biscuits are made from rolled puff pastry and regular granulated sugar. Flaky, buttery layers, crispy caramelized crunch – they are literally melt-on-the-tongue goodness. Very fancy on a cookie tray yet despite their impressive nature, palmiers are super easy to put together.

Let me show you!

Admittedly, puff pastry is not easy to make. Or quick. That’s why I always keep store-bought, all-butter puff pastry in my freezer. The dough is the hard part and since we already got that covered, the rest is a cinch!

Although the name translates to palm tree, I prefer making them a wee bit different from the traditional shape and form delicate little hearts instead. Also, authentically they are filled with just sugar, but if you could think of a creative variant to fold into your palmiers (like cinnamon sugar, maybe?), go ahead. Just don’t tell the French I encouraged it. 🙂

First you need to thaw your puff pastry completely, which I do by transferring it from the freezer to the fridge and let it stay there overnight. Then, if you weren’t savvy enough to get the ready rolled, you roll out your puff pastry to a rectangle.

Now grab your sugar container and try shutting the part of your brain out that screams diabetes. Sprinkle the dough generously (very generously: remember, we want caramel!) with sugar and gently press into the dough to stick. Flip puff pastry sheet carefully and repeat on the other side as well.

Mark the center of the pastry sheet lengthwise (fold in half if you don’t trust your eye), and make 2 folds from each side leaving some space in the center. Roll one fold on top of the other to form a log.

To make the cuts clean and easy, refrigerate log for 30 min or pop it in the freezer for 10. Cut firmed up log to thin (0,5-1 cm) pieces. The thinner they are, the crispier they will be.

Before you place them on a baking sheet, be a love and roll them in more sugar. Well of course, both sides! To shape them into hearts, pull the two ends slightly away. Repeat with all your pastries and place them on the baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

shaping palmiers

Bake at 200°C (400°F) for 25-30 min, flipping them at the halfway mark to properly brown both sides. Watch these carefully, they are thin and can burn quickly with all that sugar. Be sure to cool them completely to give them a chance to fully crisp up (and to prevent third-degree lip burns).

Your palmiers can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for a few days, but… 1-2-3 gone! Quite hard to resist.

Palmiers

  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Perfect French Palmiers pastry. Makes about 30.

Ingredients

1 all-butter, ready rolled sheet of puff pastry, thawed

granulated white sugar

Directions

  1. Roll out puff pastry sheet and sprinkle generously with sugar. Press gently for sugar to stick to pastry.
  2. Flip pastry over, and repeat sprinkling and pressing.
  3. Mark center lengthwise. Make 2 folds from each side, leaving some space in the center.
  4. Roll one fold on top of the other to form a log.
  5. Refrigerate log for 30 min to firm up.
  6. Preheat oven to 200°C (400°F), line baking sheet with parchment paper.
  7. Cut dough to ½-1 cm thin pieces, roll both sides of cookies in sugar.
  8. Shape cookies by pulling two ends slightly away, place on baking sheet.
  9. Bake for 10-15 min, flip to bake evenly on both sides, than bake for another 10-15 min, watching pastries carefully.
  10. Cool before serving. Enjoy!

Love,

Fruzsi

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