Red Wine Poached Pears

red wine poached pears

Impressive, spectacular, elegant, fancy: a few words popping to my mind when I look at poached pears. They are complicated only until you try making them though, because actually this dessert is really easy. Hint: Holiday Table Showstopper.

When it comes to fall fruits, pears usually take the backseat to apples in terms of popularity. Why, I don’t know. Next time you’re out grocery shopping or better yet, at the farmers market, be sure to pick some up either to make this beautiful dessert, to roast them with honey and walnuts, bake up a cake with or to enjoy along some good cheese.

I admit I made wine poached pears last weekend because I was too ashamed to make mulled wine. The weather is still very much summery here with high temps and lots of sun, and you start drinking mulled wine when the cold rainy days hit… right?! Not me. I am already in the mood for mulled wine, in fact I’m rarely ever not in mulled wine mood. I should be the ambassador for this drink, if such a title exists.

Aaanyhow. For poaching, you’ll need pears that keep their shape when cooked, so look for firmer varieties. Any pear that is not overly ripe is ok, but mushy and bruised ones are not the way to go.

Poached pears take a little time to make but lucky for us, most of that time is hands-off.

First you put together the poaching liquid – spiced wine in this case (I used a Cabernet). Be sure to buy a decent bottle! When choosing wine for cooking there’s really no need for top shelf, but remember to always get something you’d be willing to drink. And you are not limited to red wine either – white wine, moscato, champagne, even chai tea works great for poaching fruits.

While the spices are infusing the liquid (and I get my fix of mulled wine smell), peel the pears: work in long, even strokes, leaving the stems on. If you want to serve your poached pears upright, slice the bottoms flat.

Next, transfer pears to poaching liquid. Depending on size and firmness, it takes 20-30 minutes of gentle simmer for the pears to get nice and tender. Turn them with a slotted spoon occasionally to ensure even cooking and color. Pro tip: put a small plate over them to weigh down if necessary.

The longer the pears sit in the flavorful spiced wine, the better they’ll taste so if you are making this recipe ahead, cool the fruit in the liquid once cooked and refrigerate overnight. If you don’t have that much time on your hands, the poaching liquid can be cooked down to a syrup immediately after the pears are ready.

The last step is to remove the pears from the wine and to reduce the liquid to a thin syrup. You do this by bringing the poaching liquid to a boil, than lower the heat to a steady simmer and cooking it down to about half its original volume, stirring occasionally.

Poached pears are great served chilled or warm (you can reheat them gently). Provide your guests with both a fork and a spoon – a fork to help secure the pear and the spoon to eat it with. Serve pears drizzled with the syrup, add a dollop of whipped cream, greek yogurt, whipped mascarpone, or vanilla ice-cream, and for some added texture, sprinkle with crunchy hazelnut croquant or toasted sliced almonds.

Red Wine Poached Pears

  • Difficulty: easy
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Spectacular yet easy poached pears in a spiced red wine syrup. Serves 4.

Ingredients

1 bottle dry red wine

½ cup sugar

1 cinnamon stick

4 cloves

2 allspice

4 firm, ripe pears

Directions

  1. Combine wine, sugar and spices in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer 5 min. While liquid is infusing, peel pears.
  2. Place pears in poaching liquid, simmer for 20-30 minutes turning occasionally. Pears should be cooked but still firm.
  3. Remove and discard spices, set pears aside. Bring poaching liquid to a boil, lower heat to medium and cook until reduced by half and syrupy, about 30 min. (Alternatively, cool pears in liquid to room temperature, than refrigerate 2 hours or up to 24 hours. Reduce wine before serving.)
  4. Place pears on serving plates, drizzle with sauce and serve with vanilla ice-cream sprinkled with hazelnut croquant. Enjoy!

Love,

Fruzsi

Friday Finds

Pumpkins, pumpkins, and let’s see… more pumpkins? And not just the pie, but some decor as well!

Chalk Paint Pumpkins by Shaunna of Perfectly Imperfect:

chalk paint pumpkins

DIY Decorated Pumpkins by Caitlin of The Glitter Guide:

decorated pumpkins

Pumpkin Centerpiece by Courtney of French Country Cottage:

pumpkin centerpiece

Neutral centerpiece via Freshideen:

pumpkin centerpiece

Fabric Covered Pumpkins by Liz of Love Grows Wild:

171006-friday-finds-pumpkin4

Happy weekend!

Fruzsi

Homemade Appleasauce Because It’s Apple Season (Enthusiastic Thumbs Up)

apples on linen

On this climate, apples are one of, if not the most widely available and cheap fruits. I don’t know a single soul who doesn’t like apples, and with colder days approaching, the idea of a warm slice of anything with apple and cinnamon gets stuck in my head like earworms.

Cinnamon-apple is our pumpkin pie spice: come fall, every product gets this flavor update from cereal to yogurt to porridge to rice pudding to bubble gum to scented toilet paper. No kidding!

And while the whole health picture just might be more complex than eating an apple a day to keep the doctor away, apples undeniably supply nutrition vital for good health.

This fruit is a great source of natural fiber that lowers risk of heart disease by decreasing bad cholesterol levels. A serving can supply much of your daily vitamin C needs, plus the flavonoids in apples reduce inflammation, regulate blood pressure, and reduce excessive fat production in the liver. Also, phytonutrients in them work as antioxidants.

Not bad from the humble apple, huh?

If you have a few that you won’t be able to eat before they get grainy, soft and wrinkled, or you simply want to stock up on a delicious, healthy and versatile food item, turn them into applesauce! It’s inexpensive, takes no time to make and keeps well canned or frozen as well.

Commercial applesauce is not a common sight in Hungarian supermarkets, but I don’t mind at all. The advantage of making my own at home is that I can choose my favorite apples and make the applesauce as sweet or as tart as I prefer.

Applesauce contains only about 100 calories per serving (if you choose to make it unsweetened), and while most of those calories come from sugar, it’s the naturally occurring fructose.

There’s no fat in it, yet applesauce is a great substitute for fats in baked goods. Try swapping half of a recipe’s margarine, butter, shortening or oil component with applesauce to reduce calories while adding fiber. The finished baked item will have a tender, crumbly texture and a slightly sweeter flavor.

As I said, applesauce is really easy to make. This recipe is for 4,5 kg (10 pounds) of apples, which will yield somewhere around 3 to 3,5 litres (7 pints) applesauce. I used golden delicious apples this time.

homemade applesauce

Here’s how to make applesauce at home:

Wash, peel, and core apples. To prevent browning, slice apples into water containing ascorbic acid (1 tsp to a gallon of cold water).

Place drained slices in a heavy bottomed pot, add ½ cup water. Stirring occasionally to prevent burning, heat quickly until tender (5 to 20 minutes, depending on maturity and variety). Don’t overcook, it’s not a jam.

Blitz with an immersion blender until completely smooth. Reheat sauce to boiling (it will spatter, so be careful) and add the juice of 1 lemon, or 1 tsp citric acid to serve as a natural preservative.

Fill sterilized jars with hot sauce, leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process in boiling water for 15 min. Applesauce can be frozen as well.

Traditionally, applesauce is eaten along cooked meat or roasts around here, but I’m beginning to see it in desserts as well. I like it either way. If you can’t imagine applesauce with a slice of roast beef, give my healthy oat bars recipe an autumn update substituting the fig jam with applesauce heavily flavored with homemade apple pie spice, or try apple pie baked oatmeal for a delicious and filling breakfast.

Love,

Fruzsi

Title image by Lindsey S. Love

Friday Finds

I’ve yet to learn knitting. It must be because of today’s unusually fall-ish, gloomy weather that I ended up with these images of fuzzy spools of yarn and twine, but they give me such a warm feeling and I find these textures and soft colors so very lovely!

Via Hus & Hem:

white yarn in basket

Via Tumblr:

twine in silver bowl

Via Olive Manna:

spool of twine

Via Blickwinkel:

wool yarn in basket

Via Valdirose:

twine and dried flowers

Happy weekend!

Fruzsi

Friday Finds

You are never too old to play in the leaves!

Poppies (photo by Maria Sånge of Green Heart):

dry poppies

It’s an inside job:

happiness is not a checklist Beau Taplin

“Light and mist and dead leaves” photo by Elena Morelli:

autumn forest road

Marbled pillar candles available at Nordic House:

marbled pillar candles

Rosehips on thin wire, how pretty is this? (from Fun Tea Party Ideas)

rosehip heart with twine

Happy weekend!

Fruzsi

Friday Finds

And the sun took a step back, the leaves lulled themselves to sleep and Autumn was awakened.

Raquel Franco

Rosehips (photo © C. Schultheis):

rosehips

Sometimes less is just more. (floral watercolor by Celeste Clark)

simpler is sweeter floral watercolor

Loving this fall centerpiece by Lucy of Craftberry Brush:

fall centerpiece with seltzer bottles and velvet pumpkins

This patchwork parquet is giving me serious cabin fever (Raphael Navot, Vedes Rénovation):

patchwork parquet

I can almost smell this (miracle no knead bread by Lindsay of Pinch of Yum):

no knead bread

Happy weekend!

Fruzsi